The Monday Kickoff

Start your week with nine curated reads, served fresh each Monday

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Environment

How Can We Stop the Air We Breathe from Slowly Poisoning Us?, wherein we learnhow our lungs work as a prelude to discovering what dirty air does to our lungs, and how we can fight back.

Nuclear power is not the answer in a time of climate change, wherein Heidi Hutner and Erica Cirino argue against replacing fossil fuels with atomic energy slow climate change.

Climate change: 'We've created a civilisation hell bent on destroying itself – I'm terrified', writes Earth scientist, wherein James Dyke contends that our inability to take steps to stop climate change is partly because of a global love affair with growth and with a system we can't control.

History

Who really owns the past?, wherein we ponder what cultural heritage is, why people are so keen to preserve it, and who those preservation efforts actually benefit.

Ancient DNA is revealing the origins of livestock herding in Africa, wherein we learn about research that is piecing together the puzzle about when and how peoples in Africa transitioned to a more pastoral lifestyle, and what that can mean for the future.

We Could Have Had Electric Cars from the Very Beginning, wherein we get a history of the early automobile in America, and learn why petrol-powered vehicles beat out electric ones despite the early successes of EVs.

Odds and Ends

Dementia Stopped Peter Max From Painting. For Some, That Spelled a Lucrative Opportunity, wherein we read about how some of the people around the Pop Art icon have allegedly been taking advantage of his condition and exploiting him.

Tokyo dawn: is the impenetrable city finally opening up?, wherein we discover how Tokyo (and, by extension, the rest of Japan) is starting to become more open and welcoming to outsiders, in a large part because of necessity.

The Curse of the Ship of Gold, wherein we learn how engineer Tommy Thompson's dream of pushing the boundaries of deep sea exploration turned into a living hell of lawsuits, life on the run, and prison time.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

A while back, I mentioned that I'd be devoting the occasional edition of The Monday Kickoff to a single topic. This is one of those editions. I hope you enjoy it!

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Ideas

A City Is Not a Computer, wherein Shannon Mattern posits that the vision technologists have of so-called smart cities might not be the vision that urban areas need, or which city dwellers want.

The Inescapable Town Square, wherein LM Sacasas ponders what social media is and why we can't really escape it.

How the news took over reality, wherein Oliver Burkeman examines our relationship and interaction with the news as it's become more ubiquitous and, to a small degree, and more interactive (not always in a good way) thanks to social media.

Music of the Squares: David Ramsay Hay and the Reinvention of Pythagorean Aesthetics, wherein we're exposed to the ideas of Victorian artist David Ramsay Hay, who applied music theory to physical objects to determine their beauty.

Rules in space, wherein Marko Kovic looks at some of the potential legal and political issues that could result from nations on Earth colonizing space.

Shade, wherein Sam Bloch looks at how shade is unevenly distributed throughout Los Angeles, and explains why shade should be considered a public good in LA (and elsewhere).

The Artificial Intelligence of the Public Intellectual, wherein Soraya Roberts charts the origins, rise, and recent decline of the so-called public intellectual.

The faux revolution of mindfulness, wherein Ronald Purser argues that the current fixation on mindfulness is mostly a crock, and that embracing it can have harmful effects on us and our society.

The Books of College Libraries Are Turning Into Wallpaper, wherein Dan Cohen examines why university students are using fewer dead-trees books and what what caused that change.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Instead of me prattling on, I'll leave you with this piece of wisdom:

The new world is struggling to be born, carrying passive repercussions of the past and facing active opposition from the old. The future is in place, and waiting, but we have yet to discover it. Our present position is the bridge between. This position is hazardous, because we are building the bridge while crossing it.

Robert Fripp

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Science

Why We Should Think Twice About Colonizing Space, wherein Phil Torres argues that humanity shouldn't venture out into the stars, and discusses why doing that could lead to our destruction rather than our salvation.

The Earth's magnetic north pole is shifting rapidly – so what will happen to the northern lights?, wherein we learn about the magnetic north pole and the effects of it shifting on scientists.

Phage therapy: curing infections in the era of antibiotic resistance, wherein we learn about drugs, made from some really disgusting stuff, that may be the key to beating diseases that fight back against our best antibiotics.

Crime

Drugs, guns and politics collided in the small town of Port Richey. Two mayors went to jail, wherein we get a detailed look into the decline and fall of a former mayor of a small city in Florida, and what happened to his successor.

Joe Exotic: A Dark Journey Into the World of a Man Gone Wild, wherein Leif Reigstad regales us the tale of a man whose dreams (and life) crumbled amid personal misfortune, bad business decisions, and accusations of planning a murder.

The mobster in our midst, wherein we learn about John Franzese Jr., whose testimony put his mobster father in prison, his downward spiral, and how he's been trying to reconcile his past.

Technology

Before Netscape: The forgotten Web browsers of the early 1990s, wherein we discover (and some of us old enough to remember those days, rediscover) the diversity of web browsers that came and went in the web's infancy.

Technology Is as Biased as Its Makers, wherein Lizzie O'Shea argues that tech firms need to be more accountable for their creations, and examines the havoc those creations sow.

The global internet is disintegrating. What comes next?, wherein we get a look at how some countries are trying to stop the internet at their borders, and how they're trying to push that idea, and the tech behind it, elsewhere.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

It's another interesting mix this week, culled from several familiar and a few new sources. Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Environment

Heaven or High Water, wherein Sarah Miller goes to Miami to discover what the city is doing about the dangers of rising sea waters caused by climate change, and discovers how delusional some people in that city are about those dangers.

Could Adapting for Climate Change Make Inequality in Cities Worse?, wherein we learn that while cities should be trying to battle climate change, they need to also take into account poorer residents when making decisions and putting those decisions into action. Something that's not always happening.

Los Angeles Fire Season Is Beginning Again. And It Will Never End, wherein we get a scary glimpse into what's looking like our climate future, with wildfires burning hotter and more frequently, and with little or nothing we can do to contain or stop them.

Arts and Literature

JT LeRoy: The US's greatest literary scam, wherein we learn how a writer created a controversial literary persona and how her sister-in-law brought that persona to life.

The Joy of Watching (and Rewatching) Movies So Bad They’re Good, wherein Michael Musto revels in, and explains the cathartic pleasure of, watching really bad movies even when there's something better to cast your gaze upon.

Why We Write About This Thing Called the Future, wherein Naomi Alderman looks at how and why SF writers see the future — often as a mirror of society today.

Odds and Ends

A Casino Card Shark’s First Time Getting Caught, wherein Roze Travis tells the tale of how she fell in with a crew of professional card counters, and the first time she got caught and ejected by security at a Las Vegas casino.

Kidnapping: A Very Efficient Business, wherein we learn about the mechanics of kidnapping, and about the (high-priced) cottage industry of kidnapping and ransom insurance that threats of being snatched has spawned.

The Sad Tale of Frank Olson, the U.S. Government's Hallucinogen Fall Man, wherein we're introduce to the highest profile victim of the CIA's MKUltra project and how he became the main poster boy for the criminalization of psychedelic drugs in the U.S.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

It's one of those grumpy, plodding Mondays which means that I can't be bothered to offer up any nuggets of dubious wisdom or motivation. So, let's get this Monday started with these links:

Business and Economics

How Inequality Statistics Can Mislead You, wherein we take a closer look at the elephant graph and learn that, for most people around the world, the view of their rise in income isn't as rosy as the graph makes it out to be.

AT&T promised 7,000 new jobs to get tax break — it cut 23,000 jobs instead, wherein we get a glimpse at how yet another large corporation, this time a telecommunications giant, that took advantage of government largesse and deliberately dodged delivering on its promises.

Inside Google's Civil War, wherein we get a look into the internal tensions at the tech giant, tensions that are pitting employees against a management they believe has strayed from the company's core principles.

Science

Your Skeleton Reveals More About You Than You Think, wherein we're introduced to the work of pathologists, and how that work not only helps us understand ourselves, but also understand early humans and even long-extinct animals.

A revolution in time, wherein Paul J Kosmin recounts how we came to measure the passage of years in the way that we do, and the political, religious, and historical changes that it wrought.

Switch from hunting to herding recorded in ancient pee, wherein we learn how a group of archaeologists used a novel method to determine when neolithic humans began switching to a herding lifestyle in ancient Turkey.

Ideas

Notes on Citizenship, wherein Nina Li Coombes ponders the nature of citizenship, and holding dual citizenship, and how the idea of citizenship doesn't always live up to the expectations that many ascribe to it.

Get Thee to a Phalanstery: or, How Fourier Can Still Teach Us to Make Lemonade, wherein Dominic Pettman examines 19th century French philosopher Charles Fourier's ideas about a perfect society, and how some of those ideas could apply to the modern world.

How Not Having an Opinion Has Improved My Quality of Life, wherein we learn that saying something like I don't have an opinion on that isn't about shrinking from debate, but about avoiding knee-jerk reactions and taking the time to stop and think more deeply about a topic or idea.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

It's an interesting (at least I think it's interesting) mix this week, with a couple of articles from some sources I don't usually dip into. That doesn't mean they're not the usual quality I look for. It's just that there's always something new to discover.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Arts and Literature

When the Highest Paid Hollywood Director Was a Woman, wherein Sasha Archibald introduces us to the life and work of pioneering filmmaker Lois Weber, and to the attempt to write her out of film history.

Malcolm McDowell and the making of Lindsay Anderson’s 'O Lucky Man!', wherein we learn about the beginnings and fraught journey to completing the classic early 1970s film O, Lucky Man.

Was Shakespeare a Woman?, wherein we're drawn into another chapter of a never-ending literary saga, and are introduced to yet another theory about who actually wrote the plays and sonnets attributed to the Bard of Avon.

Technology

The Do’s and Don’ts of Tech Regulation, wherein Aral Balkan shares some ideas about the right ways and wrong ways in which governments can regulate companies like Facebook.

Cheating At Monopoly, wherein Rob Larson reminds us that, regardless of what certain founders and their cheerleaders say, the basis for what many tech giants are peddling wasn't created by them, but was the result of government-funded research at academic institutions and by the military.

Most Tech Today Would be Frivolous to Ancient Scientists, wherein we take a walk down the path of what's new is old again and learn that, despite modern STEM sorts, imagining they had invented everything, the work of ancient Greeks and Romans is the foundation for much of today's engineering and technology.

Odds and Ends

The Torments of Spring, wherein Christopher Benfey examines why some people dread the onset of the season before summer, and how April can be the cruelest month.

Notes on Being Very Tall, wherein Nicholas Kulish explains the physical, social, and psychological roadblocks that people over two metres in height face.

The violent attack that turned a man into a maths genius, wherein we hear the story of how Jason Padgett went from being concerned only with having a good time to someone who sees math everywhere, all thanks to a brutal blow to the head.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

July is a week old, and before we know it the end of the year will be upon us. It all happens so fast, doesn't it? Sometimes, I feel that we don't get enough time for reflection. So I guess we need to take as much of that time as we can.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Ideas

How Did Conspiracy Theories Come to Dominate American Culture?, wherein we learn that conspiracy theories have been woven into the fabric of America since the beginning of the nation, but now have emerged as the belief system of the twenty-first century.

A Social – and Personal – History of Silence, wherein Jane Brox explains why silence is necessary is a world filled with sound and noise.

An Appalachian Trail, wherein we learn that the Appalachian Trail was meant to be more than a hiking path. It was meant to be a wholesale reinvention of social life, economic organization, and land use.

The Dark Side of Technology

China wants to shape the literary taste of its netizens, but is it working?, wherein we learn that China's censorship extends to fiction posted online that could potentially offend the government — including a writer whose editors deleted the number 64 from his story.

Using GPS instead of maps is the most consequential exchange of technologies in history, wherein Lucian K. Truscott IV explains that GPS supplanting physical maps could have some very bad consequences, especially for the military.

What Turing Told Us About the Digital Threat to a Human Future, wherein Timothy Snyder examines mathematician Alan Turing's imitation game and ponders, 70+ years on, the effects of that idea on humanity in light of the rapid development of artificial intelligence.

History

Tracing the Incredible Journey of Polynesians Around the Globe, wherein Christina Thompson ponders how, when, and why groups of prehistoric people were able to find and colonize islands scattered throughout the south Pacific.

Japan's World War II poster propaganda against Britain in India, wherein we learn about Japan's efforts to win the hearts and minds of people on the Indian sub continent (and the rest of Asia) during World War II.

The curious origins of the dollar symbol, wherein we're exposed to some interesting theories about where the ubiquitous symbol for money came from.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Technology

Could We Blow Up the Internet?, wherein we learn that it's not all that easy to physically destroy or cripple (or even heavily damage) the infrastructure that delivers the internet.

The continuing, appalling idiocy of “modern”, “smart” phones, wherein we learn that true innovation in the smartphone world isn't around features and ergonomics, but should be focused on creating a standard battery for all phones.

On the Trail of the Robocall King, wherein we enter the world of one of TripAdvisor's fraud investigators, who tracked down a notorious autodialer operator, and in which we learn how big a problem robocalling is in the U.S.

Environment

A Future Without Fossil Fuels?, wherein Bill McKibben analyzes the global move towards renewable energy, the obstacles that move is still facing, and the consequences it will have on the energy industry.

A World Without Clouds, wherein we learn how losing clouds, in conjunction with climate change, could result in the Earth warming to catastrophic levels.

The Vulnerability of Home on an Afflicted Planet, From California to Calcutta, wherein Torsa Ghosal ponders the effects of climate change on her homes (India and the U.S.), and how in that regard the two countries aren't all that different.

Odds and Ends

How To Lose Everything And Get Some Of It Back, wherein we hear the story of former pro basketball player Gus Gerard who, after sliding into the abyss of addiction, managed to pull himself back out and put himself on the road to a relatively normal life.

Smartphone Seminar, wherein Camille Miller shares the story of how her 86-year-old grandfather bought his first iPhone and how he understands better than most of us what this technology is for.

The New Social Network That Isn’t New at All, wherein we learn why newsletters are (re)gaining popularity, and why many people and firms are using them rather than social media to share and promote their work.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Crazy days these are, folks. Crazy days. But in all the craziness, don't forget to tell your nearest and dearest how much they mean to you.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Productivity

A Guide to Letting Go of Stress, wherein Leo Babuata teaches us how to handle the avalanche of ... well, everything in our lives that weighs on us.

The Ultimate Productivity Hack is Saying No, wherein James Clear explains that to actually get some things done, you have to refuse to do many other things.

The life-saving power of a simple checklist, wherein we learn how following a checklist can help surgeons to not gloss over small but vital steps during operations, and how a checklist can help in other areas of work and life, too.

Ideas

The Digital Unconformity, wherein Doc Searles ponders whether or not our digital footprints will survive into the future, and if they do whether or not anyone will be able to read or understand those footprints.

Has the New Dark Age Begun Yet?, wherein Peter Fleming explains the need to chronicle the decline of civilization (ours, in case you're wondering) and how knowing how to face the awful truth permits us to finally face ourselves.

The Beauty of Being Satisfied With 'Enough', wherein we learn that maybe we should rethink our relationship with possessions and the earth, and try to achieve excellence, integrity and contentment over wealth and power.

Business

Do Corporations Like Amazon and Foxconn Need Public Assistance?, wherein E. Tammy Kim argues that government incentive packages to big businesses in auction-ready form, are generally undemocratic, and that the people in the communities affected by those incentives should be consulted at all stages of those deals.

Have We Reached Peak Lyft?, wherein Daniel Albert looks at the phenomenon of Peak Car and how companies like Uber and Lyft are making an almost Quixotic effot to fill the supposed gap of people buying fewer cars and to fulfill their need to get around.

The Corporations Devouring American Colleges, wherein we learn about the online program management companies that have wormed their way into American higher education, and how those companies have helped contribute to rising tuition costs and levels of student debt.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Work

Why Are Young People Pretending to Love Work?, wherein we learn how and why millenials came to embrace the cult of the hustle, and about the negative effects of that embrace.

Workism Is Making Americans Miserable, wherein we see how work has gone from being a way to buy us free time to being central to our identities and lives, with the inevitable negative effects.

On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs, wherein David Graeber looks at how someone was out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working.

Writing

Old-school writing tools boost creativity, focus—and speed, wherein we discover that being a good writer has little or nothing to do with the tools that you use, but instead is a matter of focus and hard work.

Storytelling Tips from the Writer of Blade Runner, wherein Hampton Fancher imparts some solid advice that can make your fiction or screenwriting stronger, more interesting, and more compelling.

On Taking Time, wherein Elizabeth Cook explains that sometimes writing requires an author to step back and ponder, rather than merely put the first thing that comes into their heads on the page.

Odds and Ends

Unwanted at Midlife: Not Old, but “Too Old”, wherein we learn about middle ageism, which holds back or even halts the careers of perfectly competent and capable older workers in all occupations.

The Politics of UFOs, wherein we get a look into the community of UFO researchers and believers, the ways is which the community is riven, and how fears of provocateurs and infiltrators are widening those divisions.

Lost at Sea, wherein Joe Kloc enters the world of anchor outs, people living on boats and barges in the small bays around San Francisco, and tells us about their struggles to survive both day to day and outside of society.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt

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