The Monday Kickoff

Start your week with set of links on a variety of topics, served fresh each Monday

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Instead of me prattling on with one of my insipid trains of thought, here's a bit of wisdom I encountered last week:

The new world is struggling to be born, carrying passive repercussions of the past and facing active opposition from the old. The future is in place, and waiting, but we have yet to discover it. Our present position is the bridge between. This position is hazardous, because we are building the bridge while crossing it.

Robert Fripp

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Crime

That Night, It Never Ends: A Story of Life With or Without Parole, wherein we're introduced to some of the people, and to the politics, involved in granting parole to those who committed capital crimes as teens, and to the struggles of everyone touched by those crimes.

How Ex-Cop Rigged McDonald’s Monopoly Game and Made Millions, wherein we hear the strange and sordid tale of Jerry Jacobsen, a seemingly honest ex cop who allied himself with a motley cast of characters and defrauded a fast-food giant of millions by cheating one of its best-known promotions.

The SIM Hijackers, wherein we dive into the dark art of SIM card swapping, by which crackers get control of your mobile phone number and your digital life.

Ideas

How Librarians Survive on the Frontlines of Fake News, wherein we learn just how they do that: by doing their jobs. By providing information that goes beyond the usual Twitter eyeball bytes. By providing information which can help people become better informed.

Who owns the moon? A space lawyer answers, wherein we're introduced to the intricacies of the 1967 Outer Space Treaty, and how interpretations of the treaty can open doors to legal battles over the moon and other bodies in our solar system.

Smooth Spaces, Fuzzy Lives, wherein Rachel Andrews explores the physical border between the two Irelands, and how borders (both real and imaginary) divide peoples and divide us within ourselves.

Science

The Bugs Are Winning, wherein we learn how and why bacteria become resistant to antibiotics, the dangers of that resistance, and hear some proposals to slow the process down to save lives.

To Remember, the Brain Must Actively Forget, wherein we learn about the role some researchers believe forgetting plays in forming memories, and discover a bit about the nature of remembering and forgetting.

The Poetry of Victorian Science, wherein we read about the work of Victorian natural philosopher Robert Hunt who melded and connected poetry and science to better describe the wonders of our world.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay, Plasso, or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

About a week and a half ago, a reader asked if I'd consider including foreign-language articles in my weekly recommendations. That's a good question, and answer to that question is No. I'm a poly-not, not a polyglot. English is my only language, and unless I can read and understand an article or essay, I can't recommend it.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Ideas

Data! Data! Data!, wherein D.L. Dusenbury examines the idea of data in the context of Sherlock Holmes stories, and how Holmes was the fictional prototype of the observant machines which began appearing in the 20th century.

Terraforming Ourselves, wherein Alexi Sargeant ponders the development of science fiction, how it has always sparked generational battles between authors, and how (in many cases) it failed to deliver a promised future.

Isaac Asimov: Becoming Educated, wherein we get a few very important lessons from the legendary, polymathic author who shows us the value of continually educating ourselves, and the importance of including fiction in that education to further open our minds.

Writing

I Worked in Biology for 17 Years… Then I Became a Writer, wherein Grace Dane Mazur chronicles her journey from scientist to scribe, and how she learned that Visual Arts, Biology, and Writing are all different forms of getting at that necessary activity: Paying Attention.

You don't have to live in public, wherein Austin Kleon makes the case for creative people (not just writers) to step back from social media and focus on creating.

When Poets Write Novels, wherein we're treated to a list of the 10 best novels written by people who are or were better know for writing verse.

Various

‘Day Zero’: From Cape Town to São Paulo, large cities are facing water shortages, wherein we learn how close to a crippling water crisis many large cities around the globe are (or were), and are presented with a few ways to fend off such crises.

They Meet Up in Motels Across America ... to Trade Old Beer Cans, wherein we get a glimpse into the world of people (mostly men) who collect beer cans and beer bottle tops, and delve into their passion for that hobby.

There are two ways to read, but one is useless, wherein we discover that reading doesn't need to be the academic chore we learned it was, and that the way you read plays a major role in what you take away.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay, Plasso, or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

I stumbled across this quote recently, and it really sums up what I'm once again trying to do with my online presence:

RSS isn’t dead. Social media works great for link notifications, not so much for complete thoughts or even not-fully-baked considerations. The fields are on fire and being sprayed with liquid shit. Dig your own garden, build your own structures, make your own space.

Warren Ellis

If you have the skills and the knowledge (and it doesn't take much of either, trust me!), then I encourage you to make your own space in the digital world.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Science

Why Are New Antibiotics So Hard to Find?, wherein we're taught how antiboitics fight bacteria, how bacteria fight back, and the difficult problem of resistance to some of our most important drugs.

Solid or Liquid? Physicists Redefine States of Matter, wherein we discover the very subtle differences between the two, and what those differences involve.

The tools humanity will need for living in the year 1 trillion, wherein we learn about what intelligent civilizations will do for resources in a far-flung future where so-called dark energy becomes the dominant form of energy in the universe.

Crime

The First Family of Counterfeit Hunting, wherein we meet Rob and Jason Holmes, and hear the story of how they became effective (and hated) online counterfeit investigators.

How one man went from hunting meteorites to being hunted by the law , wherein we watch how a dispute between members of the small community of meteorite dealers took a potentially deadly turn, and landed one of the people involved in jail.

The Biggest Digital Heist in History Isn’t Over Yet, wherein we learn some of the details of a legendary cyber crime that robbed over 100 banks in 40 countries of $1.2 billion (USD), all through rigged ATMs.

Business

The New Startup South, wherein we learn about the city of Greenville, South Carolina, a seemingly unlikely place for a technology hub, and how it's become a boom town for startups.

Clocking Out, wherein Livia Gershon argues that Americans (and many of the rest of us, I'm sure) need to change our attitudes towards the hours that we work for our own physical and mental good.

How the Disposable Straw Explains Modern Capitalism, wherein we discover that the development of the humble straw, now a target of environmentalists, was intertwined with the development of modern America's economy and its culture.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Recently, someone asked me if I expect people to read every link I post in this space each Monday. Of course not! In fact, I don't expect you to be interested in every article I share each Monday. I do hope that you enjoy some of what you read.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Ideas

The danger of absolute thinking is absolutely clear, wherein we learn why the all-or-nothing mindset is an unhealthy thinking style that disrupts emotion-regulation and hinders people from achieving their goals.

How Blackboards Transformed American Education, wherein we learn about the research of Steven D. Krause, which should prompt us to rethink how we view technology and its adoption in the classroom.

Bach at the Burger King, wherein Theodore Giaoia argues that using loud classical music as a weapon against loiterers and the homeless, and using brief snips of it in everything from commercials to B-grade movies, devalues and destroys the beauty of the music.

Technology

It's Time for the Personal Datasphere (Finally!), wherein Andy Updegrove posits that using blockchain and open source software can help us take control of our data, and create the personal datasphere of the article's title.

The Internet of Bad Things, wherein we learn (or maybe re-learn) about the sorry state of security in the digital world. How sorry? As one research states, we should assume everything has been hacked, or could be.

The rise and fall of the gopher protocol, wherein, thanks to an article from 016, we get a picture of what made the gopher protocol the way to interact with the online world, and what led to its demise.

Arts and Literature

When, Exactly, Do Children Start Thinking They Hate Poetry?, wherein poet Chris Harris examines why kids go from loving to loathing poetry in a few short years. That change often revolves around how poetry is taught — making it more complex than it needs to be.

My Dad, the Pornographer, wherein we learn how noted SF writer Andrew Offutt lived a secret double (literary) life as the author of over 300 pornographic novels.

Seeing the Art in Medical Archives, wherein Roslyn Bernstein explores the sometimes wonderful, often eerie intersection of art and anatomical models.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Business

Throw away your corporate training plan, wherein Beatrice Karol Burks argues that changing the mindset of people, rather than teaching them skills or specific software, is the key to so-called digital transformation in government and in the workplace.

Living in an Extreme Meritocracy Is Exhausting, wherein we learn that faith in a meritocracy in the work and business worlds comes with a number of tradeoffs, especially being consistently and constantly judged in the workplace.

After 5 years and $3M, here's everything we've learned from building Ghost, wherein we see how a boostrapped online business became a popular and profitable blogging and web publishing platform, get a glimpse of its triumphs and mistakes, and find out that running a successful open source project has its pitfalls.

Productivity

Procrastination and Technology, wherein it's argued that our fascination with our screens is another step in the evolution of our long-standing social habits, and how we willingly give ourselves over to the distraction economy to get the supposed benefits of mobile services.

Writing in a journal is good for you — and so is throwing it out, wherein we learn that journals are for filling, but not really for reading.

Why I Don’t Use Digital Productivity Tools (or How a Notebook Makes Me More Productive), wherein Curtis McHale shows that you don't need a half dozen mobile and desktop apps to keep yourself organized and on top of what you need to do. All you need is a pen and a notebook (and not necessarily expensive ones, either).

Technology

There are no digital silver bullets, wherein government digital tech expert Dave Briggs offers some solid guidelines on how to plan an organization's digital transformation with the caveat that there are no perfect solutions to your problems.

What should you do when Google gets into bed with the US military?, wherein we discover how tech companies (and not just Google) rationalize working on military and secret government projects, why they do it, and the moral and ethical dilemmas their employees and customers face.

Digg's v4 launch: an optimism born of necessity, wherein we get an insider's look at the frankly shambolic development, launch, and tragic aftermath of a years-long update to the website Digg.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Storytelling has been on my mind a bit over the last couple of weeks. Specifically, what a good story is and how it's structured. One example of a well-told story is the late Chris Squire describing the night he met Jimi Hendrix. Squire, a legendary bassist and founder of the band Yes, tells a fun (though sometimes rambling) tale that has all the elements of a good story. It's also a fun peek into a bit of musical history.

I've been meaning to break down that story for a while, and still might. Stay tuned.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Arts and Literature

How LA Became a Destination on the Rare Book Trail, wherein we're regaled with a tale of two booksellers in Los Angeles in the 1920s and 1930s, a time when the book trade was anything but staid and dull.

She Caught Bullets with Her Bare Hands — and Made Magic's Glass Ceiling Disappear, wherein we're told the story of Adelaide Hermann who, due to circumstances and necessity, went from magician's assistant to headliner, and in doing so changed the world of stage magic.

Early Modern Memes: The Reuse and Recycling of Woodcuts in 17th-Century English Popular Print, wherein we learn about woodcut illustrations and how they were reused, making some of them the stock photos and meme photos of their day.

Business

Tax-Free Storage Wars, wherein we get a glimpse into the world in which the mega wealthy stashes its valuables, and the benefits (even if they're overhyped or non existent) of the facilities they use.

The Crimes That Fueled a Fantastic Brazilian Museum, wherein we're exposed to how Brazilian businessman Bernardo Paz's shady business practices, and even shadier accounting, helped him create a highly-regarded art museum that was carvedout of his country's jungle.

Wish.com and the Rise of Shipping From China, wherein we learn about the potential joys of buying directly from Chinese manufacturers via sites like Wish.com, and the potential problems that come with ordering cheap (in price and quality) goods online.

Various

How an Army of Suffragettes Helped Save America From Starvation, wherein we learn about the Women's Land Army of America which helped feed the country in the waning days of World War One and how those efforts helped lead to the vote for women.

The Tower, wherein Andrew Hagen tells the harrowing tales of some of the people caught up in horror of London's Grenfell Tower fire. It's a long, gripping, beautiful piece of writing soaked in sadness and tragedy.

The Lost Lingo of New York City’s Soda Jerks, wherein we get a glimpse into the lost world of the American soda fountain, the people who worked behind the counter, and how they slung not only refreshing drinks but also clever turns of phrase peppered with a unique slang.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

This time 'round, my picks are diverse but, in a sense, they're not. There's a common thread through most of the nine articles I'm linking to. That thread? Thought and communication, filtered through technology and how we use all three.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Ideas

To Build Truly Intelligent Machines, Teach Them Cause and Effect, wherein artificial intelligence (AI) pioneer Judea Pearl posits that to be truly intelligent, machines must develop a level of causal reasoning which most AI and machine learning specialists seem to be sidestepping.

Lost in Robo-Translation, wherein Sue Halpern encounters the joys (few) and the pains (many) of trying to use a much-hyped AI translation device while on a trip to Japan.

The khipu code: the knotty mystery of the Inkas’ 3D records, wherein we enter the world of the khipu, Inka data storage devices consisting of knotted strings, that collapse mathematics and language into something three dimensional, and which researchers have yet to decode.

Technology

Thousands of Swedes are inserting microchips into themselves – here's why, wherein we discover that over 3,000 Swedish transhumanists, out of love for and fascination with technology have eagerly had some of that technology embedded beneath their skin.

Gone but Not Deleted, wherein Luke O'Neil examines how and why we choose to preserve the digital remnants left behind when family and friends pass on.

How the Blog Broke the Web, wherein we take a stroll down the web's memory lane with Amy Hoy, who argues that hand-crafted web pages being supplanted by generated blogs took away so much of the character and originality of the web.

Arts and Literature

How communist Bulgaria became a leader in tech and sci-fi, wherein we hear the tale of Bulgaria's rise to being the IT hub of the former Eastern Bloc, and how that spawned works of science fiction that mixed the technological with the philosophical and satirical.

Exquisite Rot: Spalted Wood and the Lost Art of Intarsia, wherein we're exposed to the true beauty of the woodworking discipline of intarsia, and the natural processes that make it so unique.

If A Clockwork Orange Can Corrupt, Why Not Shakespeare and the Bible?, wherein author Anthony Burgess ponders the film adaptation of his best-know work, and concludes that film (in general, and A Clockwork Orange in particular) doesn't instigate violence but teaches a mode of dressing up violence in a new way.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or by making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Have you ever had one of those weeks? The kind that grinds you down not because of one or more big things, but a lot of little things that sap your physical and psychic energy? Which crush your creativity and your motivation like a tomato on the receiving end of an anvil drop? That was the last seven days for me. All of that might have slowed me down, but it's not going to stop me. We all, as the song says, have to keep on keeping on.

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Politics

Ego and Impulse Have Always Been a Threat to Democracy, wherein Ingrid Rossellini walks us through the meaning of politics in ancient Greece, and how the denizens of that age would be perplexed by modern politics and politicians.

Can Liberal Democracy Survive Social Media?, wherein Yascha Mounk argues that it's not social media itself that's crippling liberal democratic traditions, but rather it's the alienation so-called young digital natives are feeling towards the institutions that govern them. And us.

Among Catalan Winemakers, Separatism Uncorked, wherein Meg Bernhard wanders Spain's fiercely proud Catalan region and learns about the links the region's winemakers have to the land, and how those links help fuel the Catalan independence movement.

Writing

But What Will Your Parent Think?, wherein Morgan Jerkins muses about how much of you and your life you can (and should) put into your personal writing.

Notes on Craft, wherein we're treated to a short read that discusses what it takes to write something. And what it takes to write, and finish, that something might just surprise you.

From Star Wars to the Lord of the Rings: How to Build a World, wherein we learn about the history of world building (within literature, and without), and its importance not just to creators but to fans as well.

Various

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study, wherein Kevin Knuth argues that a fraction of UFO sightings could indicate the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence and that it's a topic worthy of open scientific inquiry, until there is a scientific consensus based on evidence rather than prior expectation or belief.

The Strange History of the “King-Pine”, wherein we discover more than we ever wanted to about the not-so-humble pineapple, and in that learning we see how that fruit became a symbol of the divine right of kings, a talisman of empire, and an object of status.

The Daring Diplomat Who Proved One Person Can Thwart an Empire, wherein we hear the tale of UN diplomat Povl Bang-Jensen who championed refugees from the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and, in doing so, had his reputation destroyed and at the same time saved the reputation of the United Nations.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

Would you believe that The Monday Kickoff was originally planned to be an email newsletter? I had a newsletter a few years ago, which I distributed using a service called TinyLetter. The problem was that I grew uncomfortable with collecting peoples' email addresses (even though I did nothing with them), and having that information collected by a third party. So a blog-ish website made the most sense.

So, there you go. Another small piece of this story ...

Let's get this Monday started with these links:

Asia

Lost: Struggling to cope with millions of unclaimed items in Tokyo, wherein we enter, however briefly, Japan's world of lost items and learn how they're lost and what happens to those items.

He was one of millions of Chinese seniors growing old alone. So he put himself up for adoption, wherein we learn about growing old in China and how young people have abandoned the old model, but the government had yet to find a new system for senior care, creating a crisis in the care of the elderly.

This Boy From Mumbai Became the World’s Unlikeliest Crossword King, wherein we're regaled with the story of Mangesh Ghogre, who cracked the intricacies of the design of American crossword puzzles. All without ever having set foot in the States.

Technology

The Digital Poorhouse, wherein Jacob Wisberg explores two books on the uses and abuses of algorithms, which describe how certain ones have hurt the poor and disadvantaged, and one of which offers a potential solution: ethical compunction rather than more data and better mining of it.

Ignore the hype over big tech. Its products are mostly useless, wherein we're treated to a contrarian view of consumer technology: that most recent advances are products and services that we really don't need.

Are You Really the Product? The History of a Dangerous Idea, wherein Will Oremus looks at a not-so-new idea — that if you don't pay for a service, your data is the product — and presents a contrarian take on the idea.

Taking Things to Extremes

The Weird, Dangerous, Isolated Life of the Saturation Diver, wherein we enter the world of the professional deep-sea divers who spend days or weeks living in giant tin cans, and the mental and physical pressures they face while working at depth.

The Wisdom of Running a 2,189-Mile Marathon, wherein we learn what drives extreme endurance athletes, what keeps them going, and what can stop them in their tracks.

Chasing an Impossible Storm, wherein Brantley Hargrove recounts the last minutes of the life of storm chaser Tim Samaras, who went out doing what he loved most.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.

Welcome to this week's edition of the Monday Kickoff, a collection of what I've found interesting, informative, and insightful on the web over the last seven days.

2018 has been a slow, reserved year for me. That's by design. I needed some time to pull back, to recharge, and to rethink. I'm slowly ramping things up, and The Monday Kickoff was the first part of that process.

I'm also working on a new project. It's not earth shaking, but I think it could be useful and interesting. Keep an eye on Mastodon, Twitter, and this space for details.

With that out of the way, let's get this Monday started with these links:

Science

New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of Deep Learning, wherein we're exposed to a concept called instruction bottleneck and how that might be the key to better, more advanced machine learning.

Fahrenheit 2017, wherein we read about the 2017 Thomas Fire, which devastated a swath of California, and learn of the human toll the disaster took on Ventura county.

We Depend On Plastic. Now, We’re Drowning in It, wherein we discover the dangers of microplastics in the world's oceans, and how they became that danger — not just to the oceans themselves but to life of all sizes in those oceans and, by extension, us.

Arts and Literature

The First Film Ever Streamed on the Internet is Kind of Crazy, wherein Wax, a very strange and very disjointed piece of cinema, is given both a critical and popular re-examination. Kind of crazy indeed ...

When the Movies Went West, wherein we learn how, almost by accident, early American filmmakers migrated to California and how the first seeds of what grew to become Hollywood were sown.

Bibliomaniacs in Battersea, wherein we get a guided glimpse at the strange and sometimes wonderful world of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association Rare Books Fair and into the world of book collectors who don't necessarily collect books in order to read them.

Crime

Deadly Chinese Fentanyl Is Creating a New Era of Drug Kingpins, wherein we learn about the new global drug trade through the story of Yan Xiaobing, an unassmuing chemicals distributor in China who the U.S. Justice Department has indicted on charges trafficking various drug analogues.

“I Killed Them All.” The Life Of One Of America’s Bloodiest Hitmen, wherein we discover the exploits and motivations of Jose Martinez, a ruthless yet personable contract killer responsible for dozens of murders across 12 U.S. states.

How Britain let Russia launder its dirty money, wherein we learn how huge sums of Russian money is laundered in the UK, they reasons why, and why it's allowed to continue.

And that's it for this Monday. Come back in seven days for another set of links to start off your week.

Scott Nesbitt


If you enjoy The Monday Kickoff, please consider supporting it by buying me a coffee, or making a micropayment via Liberapay or PayPal. Even if you don't, I'll keep doing this. Your support (even if you just read this space) is appreciated!


The Monday Kickoff is licensed under CC0 Public Domain.